stab-igator

Hello. I'm a picture-framing transman who has aspirations towards library science. If I put it on the website, you can assume I meant to do that and reblog anything at will. I like open-water swimming, painting, and needlework crafts, and I live in SF. I post a lot of selfies and I generally don't tag anything. Be excellent to one another.

Library of Congress LCCN Permalink sh2006007145 »

In case you were wondering, the LC classification for watersports is “Urination — Erotic aspects.”

If the book is about actual water sports like surfing, swimming, etc., you use “Aquatic sports” unless you’re using the Sears subject headings, in which case it’s “Water sports.”

Though if you wanted the Sears for “watersports” it would probably be “Urination — Sexual behavior” though since I can’t find a simple pattern heading for that kind of thing, check with someone who knows Sears better and is familiar with the field of piss play (which is a small subset of all people, but surely there is someone.)

If you are cataloging in French, répertoire des vedettes matières has “Sports nautiques” though I believe it should probably be “sports aquatiques,” based on what I understand the translation to be. I could be wrong, though. Both Amicus and a few French-English dictionaries agree. But since I’m only finding information via Amicus, and neither of those headings appears in LoC, I can’t say for certain what the exact appropriate heading is. And I can’t easily find anything for “Urination— erotic aspects” in French, no matter how hard I try— I am having a hard time getting a translation for the exact term, and I can’t seem to find any French-language books on watersports in WorldCat (I know, right?) though there is at least one in German, so the Schlagwortnormdatei probably has you covered if you happen to speak German.

This is probably a case for a revised LoC heading or a standardized SEE ALSO for sexual behaviors and preferences— I am pretty sure I can justify it with actual books that should be cataloged with these headings— but I’m not sure anyone at the LoC wants to hear it. Presumably they’d have normalized the sex subject headings already if they were going to, you know?

I won this tiara as Prom Princess (it’s like vice-queen or runner-up, I guess) at my senior prom in 2002, and somehow have held onto it for 12 years, a gender transition, and like eight house moves. I feel like a good rule is to never give up your tiara without a good reason? 

I won this tiara as Prom Princess (it’s like vice-queen or runner-up, I guess) at my senior prom in 2002, and somehow have held onto it for 12 years, a gender transition, and like eight house moves. I feel like a good rule is to never give up your tiara without a good reason? 

arabbara:

R.I.P. The 2976 American people that lost their lives on 9/11 and R.I.P. the 48,644 Afghan and 1,690,903 Iraqi and 35000 Pakistani people that paid the ultimate price for a crime they did not commit

“In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’”

Jay Smooth in his TED speech “how I learned to stop worrying and love discussing race” (via tropicanastasia)

Jay Smooth almost always a reblog

(via unrational)

Dude nailed it. We all need to work at being good. Even if we think we are.

(via jasmined)